Eye laser · Overview

Why laser therapy has revolutionised ophthalmology


Why laser therapy has revolutionised ophthalmology

Dr. med. Ken Selde

FMH specialist doctor for ophthalmology and eye surgery


 

Einstein placed the theoretical foundation stone

Even today, laser therapy is still a term that radiates something magical compared to other treatment methods in medicine. But why? I want to get to the bottom of the myth around laser in this blog.

Laser is an abbreviation of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Einstein developed the theoretical basis for this technology in the early 20th century. However, the first functional lasers did not come onto the market until the 1960s.

 

Laser therapy

To give you an overview of the different laser treatment methods, I must first explain the types of lasers that exist. As most of us are not physicists, I simplify the whole thing and only make reference to eye treatment, which – in simplified terms – uses heat and discharge lasers and disruptive lasers.

These are further divided into subgroups with various modifications for specific treatment areas. The laser has long been used in the treatment of classical eye diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, retinal diseases or refractive surgery (spectacle-free vision). These are further divided into subgroups with various modifications for specific treatment areas. The laser has long been used in the treatment of classical eye diseases such as glaucoma, cataracts, macular degeneration, retinal diseases or refractive surgery (spectacle-free vision).

 

AugenCener-Selde-Lasertherapie-Augenheilkunde

 

Laser diagnostics

However, the laser is not only used in therapy, but also in diagnostics – and this is an essential part of eye medicine. These diagnostic lasers are always safe, i.e. harmless to the eye. The task of these low-energy lasers is to provide the ophthalmologist with diagnoses using imaging techniques. At our ophthalmologic practice, I can spontaneously think of ten lasers that are used daily on patients for a wide variety of applications.

It is obvious that the laser has revolutionised ophthalmology, enabling treatments that were previously simply unimaginable. Despite all fascination, we must never forget that this technology inevitably involves high costs.